Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are currently in use in over 400 clinical trials and are critical components of tomorrow’s cell-based products and devices (1, 2, 3). Secretion of biomolecules by hMSC influences many biological processes and is thought to be central to the mechanism of action. Since widespread clinical use of hMSC and cell-based therapies with positive economic outcomes will be facilitated by frozen storage, cryopreserved hMSC must maintain high levels of biological function upon thaw. Additionally, while hMSC have an excellent clinical track record in terms of safety, efficacy data has been difficult to come by, suggesting that more standardized cell formats are needed. This too could be addressed by effective means of cryopreservation, allowing off-the-shelf hMSC products to be widely used in Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Engineering and for 3D BioPrinting of cells and tissues. Read More
MSC 2015is quickly approaching next month and we at RoosterBio are getting ready. This conference is arguably the single most important conference related to MSCs, and Cleveland is the considered by many to be the birthplace of the current paradigm of MSCs used in therapeutic contexts. We will be sending most of our company, and we do look forward to seeing everyone there. Not only is this...
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INTRODUCTION:

 

Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells, or hMSC, are key components of future therapeutics, engineered tissues, and medical devices and are currently in use in over 400 clinical trials (1). Bone marrow-derived MSC (hBM-MSC) have historically been the most widely used hMSC, but hMSC can be isolated from many tissues of the body including fat, umbilical cord blood, dental pulp, Wharton’s...
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Human MSCs are the single most used cell source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications, and clinical trials involving hMSCs have outpaced all other cell types in recent years (see hereand here). However, despite indications of clinical effectiveness (see here and here), there is repeated news of the failure of high-profile MSC trials to demonstrate efficacy in a number of...
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There has been much discussion in the literature and the blogosphere (here, here, and here) lately about keeping track of cellular age, and there is very good reason for this. First, there are multiple regulatory guidelines that propose tracking the age of cells used in biologics manufacturing. Secondly, it is well documented that cell phenotype and function can be compromised the older a cell is.... Read More
MSCs truly are the Workhorse of Regenerative Medicine, and their use in Orthopaedic applications is where clinical translation was initially imagined. However, the robust signaling activityof MSCs has widened the range of clinical indications to include cardiac, vascular, and neurological regeneration, as well as immunological applications (eg. GVHD, Chron’s disease), and more recently, cancer...
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Extreme cellular stress can trigger senescence, a mechanism protecting
against malignant cell transformation.
Adapted from:
Kovacic J C et al. Circulation. 2011;123:1650-1660
We’ve mentioned several times on this blog how standardizationof materials, equipment and processes is critical to driving reproducibility and robustness of living cell technologies. As we continue to engage researchers in...
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<td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/05/MSC_homing_capacity.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/05/MSC_homing_capacity.jpg" height="200" border="0" width="320" /></a></td>
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<td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Genetically-modified MSCs home to tumor cells and<br />accumulate at the tumor site. Image adapted from<br /><a class="external free" href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2011.02.012" rel="nofollow" style="background-color: #f7f7f7; background-image: none; color: #0b0080; font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 10px; line-height: 15px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none;">http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2011.02.012</a>.</td>
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<div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 115%; mso-layout-grid-align: none; mso-pagination: none; text-align: justify; text-autospace: none; text-justify: inter-ideograph;">In the body, MSCs are known to home to sites of acute injury and inflammation and migrate to tumors in response to tumor secretion of growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. However, g<span style="mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman';">iven their <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2833273/">secretion of biomolecules</a>that...</span></div> Read More
Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) are widely studied in academic circles and an attractive cell source for clinical applications. MSCs not only possess the ability to self-renew and differentiate to a number of mesenchymal lineages in vitro and in vivo [1,2], but these cells also secrete a cadre of potent trophic factors that contribute to tissue remodeling and modulate the host immune response,...
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